Beliefs That Control Our Behavior

Ever wonder why you continue to do the things that you say over and over again you will never do again?  Ever wonder why you don’t do the things that  you tell yourself over and over again that you are going to do?  I’m pretty convinced that I’m not the only one who experiences this.  So if I know that something in my life needs changing, and I even know how to change it, what is it that keeps me from following through on my goal to change it?  It’s not a lack of will power.  I have plenty of will power.  I just don’t always exercise it.  And why is that?  What keeps me from exercising my will power?

 

What we do, or don’t do, is based on what we feel about it.  And what we feel about it is based on what we tell ourselves about it.  And what we tell ourselves about it is based on our belief about it.  For example, twenty years ago, you wouldn’t catch me even close to speaking in public.  What was I feeling?  Scared.  What was I telling myself about speaking in public that would scare me?  I was afraid that people would think that I didn’t know what I was talking about, that I didn’t know what I know.  This is the belief that was controlling my behavior of refusing to speak in public.  This belief was so strong that if someone even asked me to introduce someone in public I would break out in a sweat, my heart would start racing, my hands would feel clammy, my face would feel hot, and every thought (including the name of the person I was to introduce) would disappear from my mind, leaving me paralyzed with fear.  Pretty strong belief, huh?  Strong enough to control my behavior.

 

The irony is that I intellectually (consciously) know that this belief is a lie.  It doesn’t make sense that I wouldn’t know the name of the person I was to introduce.  It doesn’t make sense that people would think I didn’t know what I was talking about.  So, in reality, this belief is a lie.  My conscious mind doesn’t even believe it.  However, my subconscious mind does believe it, and since the subconscious mind is exponentially more powerful than the conscious mind, and since our feelings are generated from the subconscious mind, these beliefs (even though they are not true) will, of course, control our behavior.

 

So where did I get this belief that was controlling my behavior?  Well, I happened to have a hypnotherapy session about this very issue (unable to speak in public), and it took me back to a memory of when I was three years old, and my mother was telling me that what I saw wasn’t really what I saw. It was, but when I insisted it was, I was punished and shamed.  Bingo!  A core belief was formed; the belief that I don’t know what I’m talking about, I don’t know what I know, and I will be shamed for telling what I know.  During the hypnosis session, I imagined rescuing that three-year-old little girl (me) and telling her that she is very smart, she knows what she knows, and she is now safe when she tells what she knows.  This subconsciously changed the belief that was a lie into a new belief which is the truth.  And guess what?  I can now speak in front of large crowds feeling very confident that I know what I know and that people will be interested in hearing me.

 

So when something isn’t working in my life, all I have to do is find the belief that is controlling the behavior, and then change it.  Sounds simple, huh?  Well, it is when I have a hypnotherapy session.  Guess I need to find the belief that is keeping me from having a hypnotherapy session whenever something isn’t working in my life.  Ahhhh, but then that’s another blog.

 

 

 



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